Tag Archives: GRRM

Wrapping Up Game of Thrones

Okay, Game of Thrones ended. People’s initial posts were on how satisfying it was (mostly rated from “I cried” to “perfectly reasonable” to “better than the previous episode at least,” with most, including me, in the middle.)

Now for the 4th wave feminist take (as that’s the anthology I’ve been editing and wrapping up this week).

One must consider that a week ago many were worried about the inherent sexist message of Jon the good Targaryen killing Daenerys the evil Targaryen whose female emotional instability (or at least it sure looked that way) made her snap and destroy her own people out of brief at her bestie’s death. (And, in a terrible race moment, Grey Worm the safely castrated and incredibly disciplined person of color also went mad with rage and snapped and ignored all rules of combat after their beloved woman of color Missandei was put in slave chains and callously beheaded to motivate them both. Ouch.)

It should be mentioned that in the books Dany still has Dothraki female buddies around and the former slaves come from many races. It’s also notable that her story was begun in the eighties. In context, some characters are warrior maidens, some prefer being princesses, and some use classic behind the scenes rule like Lady Olenna (who officially acts more through her son in the books). In this context, Dany, like Buffy, stands out as chosen one, taking the Aragorn role of destined ruler that most often defaults to male and growing beyond her marriage-bait upbringing to birth the dragons in epic fashion as early as book/season one and grow from there. Will the books follow from her rise to her fall? Perhaps. Since so many characters (Ned, Robert, the Mad King, Viserys, Drogo, Jon, Renly, Robb, Catelyn, Oberyn, Tywin, Kevan, Lysa, Joffrey, Mormont, Littlefinger, and lots of Boltons, Tyrells, and Freys) reached such a moment of epic greatness or stable power and then lost it by not noticing someone was waiting to stab him in the back in the endless game, that would certainly be believable. Dany’s Meereen and Dothraki season one adventures basically went this way too as she didn’t observe how precarious her position was.

So Daenerys’s madness is show canon now (is it fitting with her character? Fans are sharply divided, with most thinking this could have been an outcome with more episodes spent on paranoia and decline but this felt awfully sudden.) In the book she’s symbolically linked with her ancestor Aegon, fourth son of a fourth son and incredibly far down in the succession who nonetheless lives poor among the people with a wonderful mentor (Brienne’s ancestor) and becomes a wonderful king (though the tragedy of his death at Summerhall suggests his ambition for legendary Targaryen dragon eggs may have killed him, his friends, and much of his family–there’s more precedent). Daenerys’s apparent journey as chosen one, rape survivor, white savior, woman who could have brought the lost dragons back, woman demanding to rule khals and westerosi who don’t have female rulers, prince who was promised (but then not really), chooser of her own fate, and all kinds of tropes all over the problematic scale were suddenly squashed or at least abruptly resolved (which, considering the other times this happened, does seem to fit the story). If she was the third wave cool princess and chosen one who got to have all the lovers she wanted, rule the men and be chosen one (while in third wave Buffy style often being a bit racially insensitive and heavy handed though immensely likable), she didn’t get to win. Dany, you can’t just boss everyone into doing things your way because you’re a gorgeous superhero with a big army and nice dresses. We’ve moved past the Queen Victoria colonialism model and now we frown on that. The westerosi don’t appreciate your foreign army or what you’re doing with it. And the part where you’re not listening to your advisors? uh uh. We need someone more like Sansa or Tyrion who’s actually seeing how the people are coping with trying to survive and getting them square meals and medical care. If you can’t listen, the people will overthrow you, or at least the growing educated class will. Here, the show goes heavily Animal Farm or Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, stressing that conquering the world and being told you’re everyone’s messiah (and book six might spend more time celebrating her as the bringer of dawn and defeater of the Night King) will lead to killing those you hoped to protect, even as you’re convinced of your own rightness. Since something similar happens to Jon, who’s stabbed in book/season five for choosing his agenda over the desires of his people (and, wow, he knows exactly how it feels to be stabbed by those you trust). Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, of course, spends lots of time with Brutus and Cassius deciding whether the good of their country means they should betray Caesar, who’s betraying the people and all they fought for.

However, after this, Drogon doesn’t incinerate Jon (the Caesar ending, resulting in more counter-revolutions and feuds). Instead he incinerates the throne and carries Dany away—a heavily dramatic scene. If Drogon is the voice of the gods or the narrators, he’s emphasizing that Dany met justice, and that she and the throne of superconquest need to go. Chosen ones may be cool but, as with Rey on Star Wars, we don’t need a child of destiny and birthright (who ended up being Kylo Ren!); we need someone suited to the job. I had thought melting the throne where one ruler sits would divide the place into seven individual kingdoms, but it seems not.

However, this is the feminist/egalitarian moment. Feminism doesn’t seek to have an army of Amazon women ruling everything. It seeks a seat at the table where decisions are made—preferably half the seats. When one considers that in page one/episode one, the seven kingdoms and the overall country are all ruled by men, with women basically unable to inherit, only take a regency for their sons or whisper in their husbands’ ears, the council at the end is remarkably significant.

In the past (according to the main books and the Targaryen histories by Martin) Great Councils have been held in the past when inheritance was uncertain. During the first Great Council, a thousand lords chose to favor male heirs over female. King Jaehaerys I chose his son instead of his granddaughter Rhaenys. The next Great Council elected seven Lord Regents to rule until the immature King Aegon III Targaryen came of age. The final Great Council appointed the beloved but unlikely to inherit Aegon V. Stannis suggested such a council since he named Joffrey illegitimate.

Attending were Edmure Tully, Lord of Riverrun, (who did have a plot to wrap up as he’s basically been sitting around), as well as Gendry the legitimized bastard of House Baratheon, the forgettable new prince of Dorne (though Arianne and the Sand Snakes in the book are fascinating and striking—would a princess of Dorne been so much trouble?), Robin Arryn and Yara Greyjoy: heads of houses, including Yara whose people have never elected a woman ruler before. Offscreen, she retook her homeland. Sansa Stark, likewise, leads a people who have never had a female ruler. Tyrion, though it isn’t mentioned in the scene, certainly may be the inheritor of Casterly Rock. Thus the great houses now are ruled by two women, Gendry and Bronn who grew up commoners, and Tyrion who was basically disinherited for being crippled. By medieval Europe’s standards, this is massively progressive. In addition there are Arya and Bran (presumably as war heroes as they’re not heads of houses) and more minor heads Yohn Royce, Ser Brienne of Tarth (whose father may be ruling their house and perhaps is there as a war hero), Ser Davos Seaworth, and Samwell Tarly (as either Maester or house head) and four unnamed lords. This last list is not especially book-accurate as the books offer many many lords at this level. On the show, of course, most haven’t been presented or could be assumed to have died out. Visually it makes a nice spectrum of the recent heroes of the Battle of Winterfell and the older lords who survived all the struggles for the throne by staying mostly out of it (in contrast with Littlefinger, the Tyrells, and so on). Presumably the historic councils had a few women, but likely as regents for male rulers instead of ruling in their own right. This time, there were a significant number of women. When Edmure claimed he was the best decision maker as the senior head of house (and one of the few white males intended from birth for the job who was present), Sansa politely asked him to sit down. Her implication was that the younger people who had earned their places as war heroes were more suited to choose. In a year in which many voters are calling for the old white men to step aside and let others lead the US, her comment strikes extra hard.

The council ask Tyrion to choose—of the survivors, he’s arguably been in the center of most of the war, watching the Baratheons, Lannisters, and Targaryens rule. Thus the question is decided by the great observer, but someone who’s usually withheld his full loyalty, unlike Barristan and arguably Varys (who are unavailable anyway). He chooses, not Jon the war hero, but another observer who has turned down every throne including the one he stands next in line for. Tyrion’s insistence that Bran has the best story is rather romantic (though Jon certainly has a better one and others like Arya and Sansa do as well). The scene where Tyrion asks Bran his story is paying out here. Still, Tyrion’s understanding of PR is central here—this is about image as much as capability. King Bran is a disabled pacifist, not a warrior or conqueror. He has no claim to the Targaryen/Baratheon/Lannister throne (and no hint of a mystery parentage), emphasizing that this is a matter of character not birth. Further, the decision to have the Councils continue appointing kings, echoing the Iron Islands, is not democracy (poor Sam—medieval illiterate Europe just wasn’t ready!) but it’s a step closer. Fourth wave is about intersectionality–listening to the common born like Davos, the women like Brienne and the disabled like Tyrion and Bran (plus with his gifts he arguably has the most global perspective of anyone save Dany or Melissandre). Thus the era of entitled white nobles has ended and a new one has begun).

Many criticized the final episode for Bran’s not actually ruling but allowing his new council to take over. Still, the topics under discussion—prostitution and finances—seemed more appropriate for his ministers than for him to dicker over. He is withdrawn and only puts in a token appearance, allowing them to have their fun wrangling, but Robert, knows as a good king, likewise left these meetings to Ned and Jon Arryn before him.

Brienne has earned her place on the Kingsguard (has Pod? Really? Perhaps character outweighs ability. He’s certainly loyal.)  This too is a feminist shakeup, as there’s never been a woman on the Kingsguard and likely never a female anointed knight, only unofficial ones. She’s one of the few characters to get the dream she’s cultivated from the beginning.

Bronn too got the end he chose for himself—switching sides on a path to the top beside Tyrion who can respect this sort of behavior or at least understand it. One hopes he’ll be more competent than Littlefinger (perhaps Tyrion and Bran have the insight to manage him). Like Tyrion, Davos is a humble observer, now left as the last adult as the younger generation takes over. Since he has kept his lands, his wife, and about half his sons (though lost Stannis and Shireen), he’s gotten much of what he wanted – even his revenge. This wiping out of the entitled old guard born to it and replacing them with “cripples, bastards, and broken things” while giving Brienne a council seat and Sansa her own kingdom is the feminist revision, blending in fourth wave intersectionality to get some new voices into the governance of Westeros. (No people of color apparently remain, but Grey Worm will protect Nath, being their warrior so people like Missandei can grow up in gentleness and safety among the butterflies.)

Arya’s end was more startling since she never foreshadowed this particular dream (not directly anyway). Many saw her as Master of Whispers or defending the family she loved )now with options of three kingdoms) or even taking over the faceless men before leaving Westeros. There’s a trace of Yentl in her ending, seeking a new world she can live in as she likes. However, with all the new options her family and Westeros’s women have broke ground on where they are, leaving just to find another world seems less supported. However, that may be the point—her siblings have all found their perfect places and she wants her own—certainly not as the Lady of Storm’s End.

Jon, wow, he died to quit his job and the wall was collapsed too but back he goes. On the other hand, it looked like he chose not to stand on the wall for all of eternity but instead go join or lead the free folk whom he got to know and love long ago. While he won’t get Ygritte back (and didn’t seem a great match for Val in the books, though anything’s possible) he could of course defy his sentence, marry, have kids (or not) and maybe not officially hold lands up there but have a great time. This would even make him something of a ranger as he always dreamed.

No one got married to unite their houses and end the war a la War of the Roses (though there’s been so much of this in the books I’m betting the books will have some). This is good because it emphasizes women’s roles as the producers of babies and reduces them to marriage bait as a path to peace, as young Sansa and young Cersei (and heck, young Daenerys) were supposed to be. In history, the oldest daughter of basically King Robert married basically Daenerys, the prince from over the sea, and founded the Tudor dynasty to end the war because as a female SHE COULDN’T RULE IN HER OWN RIGHT (their granddaughter was Elizabeth I). None of that here.

Which of course brings us to Sansa. In episode one, everyone was certain she would make an alliance marriage and raise royal sons, since that was the destiny she and everyone like her was born to. She adapted massively (but since in the books she’s still hanging out with Robin and Littlefinger and someone else gets the Bolton plot, she isn’t clearly on this path. She could be, but so far she’s taken zero steps). She frees the North with a single demand, made at the right time. We don’t have the full Stark history, but in their patriarchal society, she’s actually the first Queen in the North ever. Will she marry and have babies or name an heir? Who knows (Queen Elizabeth stayed single and did the latter, while Victoria and Elizabeth II found worthy gentlemen/relatives who didn’t outrank them and made a love match), However, the story emphasized with a full coronation (replacing warrior males Robb and Jon) that Sansa didn’t NEED to get a husband. This makes it more a Frozen ending than a Little Mermaid one, in Disney parlance. Indeed, Sansa specifically has shown she has a good working relationship with her equals Robin Arryn and Tyrion and won’t take any claims to superiority from her Uncle Edmure (or at least they were her equals but now she’s arguably their superior and equal to Bran). She’s queen, on the basis of her birth and EARNING IT WITH HER COMPETENCE and knowledge of her people. Now that’s new in Westeros.

And if we thought this series should end with a WEDDING, we weren’t paying attention….

For more on Women in Game of Thrones, I’m the author of just that

Women in Game of Thrones: Power, Conformity and Resistance 

Along with Winning the Game of Thrones: The Host of Characters and their Agendas , Winter is Coming: Symbols and Hidden Meanings in A Game of Thrones: (A Deeper Look Into Game of Thrones Book 1)  and others.

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The Women of “The Princess and the Queen”

 

This week my new book Women in Game of Thrones hits stores. In celebration, I wanted to do a post on Martin’s women who didn’t make the book: the women of his novella “The Princess and the Queen,” which takes place centuries before our heroes in A Song of Ice and Fire.

            The plot is simple: King Viserys I dies, having made all his lords swear fealty to his daughter Rhaenyra. As the book puts it, “The late king had chosen her as his successor … hundreds of lords and knights had done obeisance to the princess in 105 AC, and sworn solemn oaths to defend her rights” (706). However, his widow, Queen Alicent, favors her own son Aegon, wedded to her own daughter Helena, over her stepdaughter, and convinces many on the Small Council that a son should supersede a daughter. Thus a civil war begins…with dragons. All this is told through a stuffy chronicler, history-book style rather than as a novel.

This is indeed a war of princess and queen as the title suggests, and the depiction of each is notable. Queen Alicent is as scheming as Circe. When her son refuses to take the throne, she points out that his half-sister will slaughter his siblings and children to eliminate those with a stronger claim. Thus the dowager’s manipulations bring about the slaughter. Through the story she appears conniving and power-hungry, even as she operates behind the scenes.

Her rival, Rhaenyra, with the prior claim to the throne, is framed as monstrous. She’s repeatedly called a bitch and most often a “whore.” The first arguments against her claiming the throne is that with her “wanton ways” she will turn King’s Landing into an immoral place (706). Her bastard children will try to inherit, and her husband will be the true power. In this, numerous double standards apply – her rival, Aegon II is “with a paramour” when his father’s death is announced. Yet he is framed as a benevolent figure, who refuses to steal his sister’s birthright until his own brothers and children are threatened. No one in the entire story (except, subtly, his wife) complains about his wanton behavior. He has presumably abandoned or concealed any bastards, in contrast to his sister who unabashedly raises them openly as her heirs. For this responsible act, she is condemned. (Similarly, in A Game of Thrones, Ned raises his bastard, while negligent Robert abandons all of his.)

Another double standard emerges when she’s frankly judged on her appearance: Once Rhaenyra was beloved, “though how many would still fight for her, now that she was a woman wed, her body aged and thickened by six childbirths, was a question none could answer” (712-713). It could be argued that the chronicler or the minds of the time are sexist, more than the novella’s author. However, the word choice used is strongly slanted and emphasizes the gender war occurring: “Every symbol of legitimacy belonged to Aegon…and he was male, which in the eyes of many made him the rightful king, his half sister the usurper” (712, italics added).

Other characters in the novella suffer the same: House Arryn “could not be relied upon [a phrase used for flighty people] for the Eyrie was presently ruled by a woman, Lady Jeyne, the Maiden of the Vale [her martial status is central to her identity], whose own rights might be called into question should Princess Rhaenyra be put aside” [her gender is her defining characteristic and motivator]. Only at the sentence’s end is it made clear she’s unreliable because of her politics, not the nature of her gender. By contrast, the male-led House Baratheon is described in the next paragraph as “staunch in support of the claims” of the family, a far more masculine label. A prophet later insists, “Your wives will dance in gowns of fire, shrieking as they burn, lewd and naked underneath the flames” (761). The husbands of course are described in a nonsexual manner.

Feminist TV makes a fair point in its defense of Cersei, a point that applies to Princess Rhaenyra as well:

 I would never proclaim that Cersei Lannister is a “good person”; she is cruel, conniving, and callous. She often acts impulsively based on her passions, and is occasionally blinded by the love she bears for her children and her twin brother Jaime… . However, I would very much say that Cersei is operating in the same value system as the vast majority of characters in this world… . But here’s the thing; most of these “corrupt value system” characters are men, and are therefore seen as “bad-asses,” “heroes,” or “rebels.” Meanwhile, Cersei gets labeled “bitch,” “terrible and whiny,” and “stupid whore” (all quotes taken from various Tumblr conversations). Want to know why? Hint: misogyny! Female characters are traditionally singled out and held to vastly different standards than male characters are, mostly because society at large teaches us that double standards are a- ok (spoiler alert—not true). So while Tywin, Tyrion, and Jaime Lannister get to be cool rebel dudes, Cersei is viewed with an amount of contempt and hatred that’s actually rather shocking (“In Defense of Cersei Lannister”).

Internet fans name Cersei “mean,” “whiny,” and a “bitch.” However, she is no harsher than Tywin, who is often admired for his viciousness. As she voices complaints about powerlessness that echo the misery of Tyrion, Robb, and Jon, she should not be condemned gender- specifically. The author concludes, “Using gendered slurs, even when talking about fictional women, matters. It matters because it propagates a way of thinking and describing women that is deeply and historically sexist. So love Cersei or hate her. Just don’t call her a bitch [“In Defense of Cersei Lannister”]. As all her stepbrothers, the commonfolk, and the story’s description depict Rhaenyra in the same terms, with constant jabs at her aggression, lewdness, and physical body, the same situation emerged, showing much about her people. Basically, every single character appears misogynist, including chronicler and author.

While Rhaenyra insists on her rights, she is unable to claim the throne because she’s on Dragonstone giving birth. The actual birth scene is grotesque: Her “black fury” at the usurpation “seemed to bring on the birth, as if the babe inside her were angry too, and fighting to get out” She curses all her family and the child, which she calls a “monster.”

 

“The princess shrieked curses all through her labor, calling down the wroth of the gods upon her half brothers and their mother the queen, and detailing the torments she would inflict upon them before she would let them die. She cursed the child inside her too. “Get out,” she screamed, clawing at her swollen belly as her maester and her midwife tried to restrain her. ”Monster, monster, get out, get out, GET OUT!”  “When the babe at last came forth, she proved indeed a monster: a stillborn girl, twisted and malformed with a hole in her chest where her heart should have been and a stubby, scaled tail” (711). 

 

The monstrous baby seems a reflection of Rhaenyra’s inner rage and monstrousness, while this evil birth is nearly as foul as Melisandre’s shadow babe. “The patriarchy feared the feminine in connection with her role in birthing and dying even more than in her association with sex” (George 222). Birth, a mystery beyond man’s sphere, thus became demonized, a hideous unholy rite like Melisandre’s, used to kill the good and innocent.

 Giving birth to a shadow creature appears to be a female-only power, requiring a womb. However, the feminine birth power is subverted: she creates a force of evil that enables Stannis to kill his closest relative and frames the good women Brienne and Catelyn for the death (in the books, she then births a second shadow creature to kill a loyal retainer of House Baratheon who’s protecting Robert’s innocent bastard son). As such, the most primal female power is depicted as twisted, vile, and obscene. Aside from Daenerys’s monstrous miscarriage, this is the only birth scene shown until Gilly’s child arrives in season three. (Frankel 134)

 Daenerys actually has a similar birth scene, with her ambition to save Drogo nearly killing her, as her child too is monstrous:

“He turned his face away. His eyes were haunted. “They say the child was …” She waited, but Ser Jorah could not say it. His face grew dark with shame. He looked half a corpse himself. 

“Monstrous,” Mirri Maz Duur finished for him. The knight was a powerful man, yet Dany understood in that moment that the maegi was stronger, and crueler, and infinitely more dangerous. ”Twisted. I drew him forth myself. He was scaled like a lizard, blind, with the stub of a tail and small leather wings like the wings of a bat. When I touched him, the flesh sloughed off the bone, and inside he was full of graveworms and the stink of corruption. He had been dead for years.” (I.756)

 

Martin appears to dislike birth, one of the world’s few gender-specific actions. Melisandre’s shadow-birth is a vile perversion. Cersei treasonously kills her child with Robert before it’s born. Lyanna (most likely) and Dalla die in childbirth, like Tyrion’s mother. Lysa Arryn loses so many babies that she grows irrational and breastfeeds her seven-year-old child. Gilly and her babe survive, but they are the children of incest and the baby is destined for the White Walkers.

            The birth scene and depiction of Rhaenyra are not the only problems. Throughout the novella, many wimpy women appear – victims of the story’s men or even of the romanticism than objectifies them. Queen Helaena, sister-wife of King Aegon, is a pitiful figure. She’s not seen making decisions about the succession or the realm – in fact, the only time she makes a decision, her choice destroys her forever. On a mission of assassination and revenge, a pair of cruel thugs from Flea Bottom bid her choose one of her sons to die (ignoring the less valuable daughter except to threaten rape). She chooses the younger, and the men spitefully strike off the elder’s head. After this, Helaena withdraws from life and sinks “deeper and deeper into madness” (722). When her husband and children flee the palace, they leave her behind for the enemy. While her children’s deaths spur Rhaenyra to fight harder, Helaena and her powerful dragon become worthless noncombatants. She commits suicide at age twenty-one, despairing.

            As with the wolves and the Starks, her dragon seems to have inherited the rage she has sublimated. Dreamfyre kills more men in the dragonpits than the other three dragons combined, “ripping men apart and tearing off their limbs even as she loosed her terrible fires” (765). Nonetheless, the dragon dies, her rage leaving the world just as her mistress does.

            The women’s roles are romanticized, as Helaena is set up as the tragic Ophelia, abused until she goes mad. Her pain is shown at a distance, with none of the dialogue that Rhaenyra offers. Likewise, “In Flea Bottom, men still speak of a candlemaker’s daughter named Robin who cradled the broken prince [Joffrey] in her arms and gave him comfort as he died, but there is more of legend than history in that tale” (763). She does not even rate a word of her own.

            Nettles, a street child near Dragonstone, actually tames the wild dragon Sheepstealer by bringing it a freshly slaughtered sheep each morning. Though she’s skinny, foul-mouthed, filthy and fearless, her abilities win her a place among the lords and ladies…she seems much like Arya, clever and bold. At the same time, however, her mysterious origin (she may or may not have Targaryen blood) and the terribly distant depiction of her make her more puzzle than character – a mystery woman archetype rather than a person.

            She fights valiantly, but when she has an affair with Rhaenyra’s husband, the irrational, raging queen orders her death. The queen condemns her for high treason as she’s “said to have become Prince Daemon’s lover.” Once more the doublestandard appears, as she adds, “No harm is to be done to my lord husband” (752). Nettles flies far away and is never seen again. Nettles ends their romance on a tragedy, but exists the mystery woman from first to last. She does not challenge the queen or her royal spouse, but silently accepts exile, covered in blood with cheeks “stained with tears” (753). Her lover sacrifices himself in battle rather than return to his wife and they are thus sentimentalized. In fact, ballads sing that Nettles and her prince were reunited in an unrealistic happy ending. Brash, brilliant Nettles’ greatest achievement and most significant story arc is in the bedroom, not the battlefield.

            Alys Rivers, paramour of Prince Aemond (himself the brother of Aegon II), is another clichéd female, this time the perfect lover and seer. She persuades the prince to offer mercy upon receiving bad news from a messenger, then sees in a mountain pool, a storm cloud and a fire, that his enemy awaits him. She rides with her lover on his dragon, “her long hair streaming black behind her, her belly swollen with child” in another glamorized image (754). She is the perfect helpmeet and caregiver even while warning her lover of the future and carrying his child. She is all things to him: support system, lover, mother, and seer.  

            Finally, Baela Targaryen, daughter of Prince Daemon and Lady Laena, defends her island of Dragonstone from King Aegon II. Her mount is the young Moondancer, “pale green, with horns and crest and wingbones of pearl” (781). Swift and agile as her rider, she and Baela have no chance against the larger, older Sunfyre, but battle him to a draw—Moondancer dead, Sunfyre dying. The men of the castle immediately take her to the healer, awed by her courage. She is brave, beautiful, silent, and idealized once more.

            Other characters are strong and powerful, set apart from the unrealistic, muzzled ideals of womanhood. Princess Rhaenys is “five-and-fifty, her face lean and lined, her silver hair streaked with white, yet fierce and fearless as she had been at two-and-twenty” (712). She herself contended for the throne with her brother Viserys, but the (male) lords of the Small Council favored the male claimant, by twenty to one, the exact situation that befalls her niece Rhaenyra. She is “The Queen Who Never Was” and one of the first to die heroically in battle. Her dragon is the ferocious “Red Queen.” Queen Alicant is likewise a force of strength in the series, raising her daughter’s little boy when she goes mad, and defending the city after her son is injured. Both women offer dialogue in council and elsewhere, sharing their thoughts with the readers and growing beyond glamorized images.

            When her stepdaughter conquers King’s Landing, Alicent is bound in golden fetters, like female archetypes and goddesses as far back as Hera (who like Alicent committed treason because she didn’t know “her place”). Rhaenyra spares her life “for the sake of our father, who loved you once,” while beheading the Small Council. While a kind gesture, it also emphasizes a woman’s proper place as the king’s beloved.

            Rhaenyra, despite her strength, ends the story by going as power-hungry and paranoid as Cersei. Her enemy, Prince Aemond, says, “Rhaenyra may call herself a queen, but she has a woman’s parts, a woman’s faint heart, and a mother’s fears” (740).  Her Cersei-like irrationality leads her to condemn her allies to death on suspicion of treachery, until she loses control of the city and her hero-son Joffrey. “The girl that they once cheered as the Realm’s Delight had grown into a grasping and vindictive woman, men said, as cruel as any queen before her” (741). They name her “King Maegor with Teats.” When the mob storms the Dragonpits, she insists, “They are vermin. Drunks and fools and gutter rats. One taste of dragonflame and they will run” (762). She is terribly, destructively wrong.  

            Although Rhaenyra is in armor, when she sits on the Iron Throne at last, those present witness the throne leaving several cuts on her legs and left hand. The dripping blood is taken as a sign that the throne had rejected her; her days as ruler would be few. This woman, is not suited to sit the throne and the realm must await her heroic brother, the true king. In a less-than-subtle metaphor, as her people rebel, the queen was “clutching so desperately at the Iron Throne that both her hands were bloody” (760).

            Even her dragon grows irrational, descending to attack the mob at the Dragonpit instead of attacking them from the air or flying away. After her dragon’s death, the queen dies horribly, cursing her brother Aegon II as his dragon devours her in six bites. Only her terrified, babied son, a Robin Arryn type “like a small pale shadow” called Aegon the Younger (776), rather than a hero, survives.

            The queen and the princess thus fought a mighty war, destroying most of the Targaryen dynasty and soon killing off the dragons forever. Both lost nearly all their children, emphasizing the tragic waste caused by female pride and ambition. Their sons are left to claim the throne (Aegon II, then Aegon the Younger) and a law is passed that never again can a queen rule Westeros. Females are thus put in their place.  

 

Works Cited

Frankel, Valerie Estelle. Women in Game of Thrones: Power, Conformity and Resistance. Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Co., 2014. 

George, Demetra. Mysteries of the Dark Moon: The Healing Power of the Dark Goddess. New York: HarperCollins, 1992.

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Martin, George R.R. “The Princess and the Queen,” Dangerous Women, edited by George R.R. Martin and Gardner Dozois. New York: Tor, 2013. 703-784.

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